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To Kill A Mockingbird Now Playing!

TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD
FROM THE NOVEL BY HARPER LEE
DRAMATIZED BY CHRISTOPHER SERGEL
DIRECTED BY JUDY FLETCHER
FRI-SUN NOV. 23-DEC 2. FRI AND SAT AT 8. SUN AT 2
7.00 ADULTS/5.00 STUDENTS WITH ID
INFORMATION: 313-845-9817
PLENTY OF TICKETS AT THE DOOR

To Kill A Mockingbird is a faithful reproduction of Ms. Lee's novel. She describes the play as "a love story, pure and simple": love for the South, a father's love for his children and their love for him. The story is about dignity, tolerance and the difficulties of growing up in a rural community in Alabama during the depression year of 1935. It is told through the eyes of Scout, the tomboyish daughter of Atticus. She is fascinated with all of the people in this small town and she is full of questions to be asked of her widower father. She wonders why the black folks have a special feeling for her father and why her white friends are hostile to her. Why is her father defending a black man who was wrongfully accused for raping a white woman? She cannot understand why Atticus would take such a case. The father replies "if I don't, I couldn't hold my head up." He uses a simile about a mockingbird. He tells her mockingbirds don't eat anyone's garden, nor do they do any other harm and that to kill one would be an outright sin.

The racial tensions have polarized the town and most white folks are against Atticus in this gothic melodrama. The first act is mostly about the love between the father and his two small children, Scout and Jem. The second takes up with the actual trial itself with the Scout and Jem and their friend Charles watching the trial from the "color segregated balcony" in the courtroom. After watching the trial, the children gain a new respect for Atticus.